Triple Tac Farms

Big dog in a small package

517-648-0152

ttacharm2@aol.com

Facebook, Triple Tac Farms

 

 

Helpful information

CRATE TRAINING

Before you crate-train, please be aware: a dog that is left in a crate all day long, gets let out in the evening after work for a few hours and put back in the crate for the night can become neurotic, destructive, unhappy and noisy. If you work all day, it is recommended that you find someone who can take your dog out for a long walk in the afternoon. Dogs are den animals and like the crate, but even a den animal would go crazy if it was locked up all day long. Keep in mind that a puppy can only physically hold it for so long before its body just has to go. This is not to say you can’t have a dog if you go to work or school full time. Just get up earlier and spend time with your dog. When you get home  take them out and then love on them some more and again before they go to bed at night.

You must be willing to invest time and energy for just a few short weeks in housetraining. The effort you put in now will last for the rest of your pet's life.

Until the pup's bladder is fully mature it will need to be taken out often. Young pups just can not hold it for too long a time.

The crate training method is as follows. Buy a crate and for the first three to four months keep your puppy in it when you are not with him. Make sure the crate is not too big. It should be large enough for the puppy to stand up and easily turn around but no larger. Dogs do not want to soil their beds and the use of a crate teaches them to control their urge to eliminate. You must maintain an eagle-eye at all times. As soon as you see him pacing, sniffing around, and turning in circles, immediately take him outside. He is telling you "I am going to go pee-pee somewhere, and this carpet looks like as good a place as any." NO, you do not have time to put on your shoes, just go.

Be patient and do not rush the little guy. He may have to go several times in one "pit stop." Give him about 10 minutes before taking him back inside. Do not play with him while you are on this mission. Let him know this is a business trip.

Make sure you take him out after every meal and play session BEFORE you put him back in his crate. Be consistent and establish a schedule. Pay attention to your puppy's behavior so you can develop a schedule that works for you and the pup. When does your puppy naturally defecate? In the morning? Ten minutes after eating? Around bedtime? You may have to make some compromises.

Be fair to your puppy. He cannot be expected to stay alone in his crate for endless hours and not relieve himself. During your work days, you will need to have someone go to your home at least once (lunchtime is good) to let the puppy out and take him for a long walk. Your dog is not a fish and he needs something to occupy his mind.

Make sure everyone who is involved in the housebreaking process is using the same spot in the yard and the same word. Everyone should agree on the place they will take the puppy. The odor from the previous visits will cause the puppy to want to go in that spot. Use a simple word like "outside" when taking your puppy to the chosen spot. Use this word consistently and later this word will help build communication between the family and the dog. When you notice him going toward the door and you say "outside" he can say, "Yup, that’s where I need to go."

Tri Pup, male

Limited registration

Many people seem to be confused as to the purpose and difference between Limited and Full registration papers.  It really is quite simple:

Limited registration is for people and dogs that are going to be pets, herding companions, even agility test or other AKC sanctioned event contestants.  They will NOT however, be used as breeding animals.

Not because there is anything necessarily wrong with them, but because either the breeder or the owner has decided that they will not/should not produce puppies.  The dog with the Limited reg. papers IS registered!  The only difference is that his or her PUPS CANNOT be registered.


 

                       DM or degenerative myelopathy

Canine degenerative myelopathy (DM) is an uncommon, progressive degenerative disease that causes hind limb weakness and paralysis and eventually affects the front limbs, as well. The symptoms of DM start gradually, usually in adult dogs over 5 years of age. Early in the course of the disease, affected dogs will start to lose muscle coordination and balance in their rear legs (ataxia). They will develop slight or incomplete hind end paralysis (paraparesis), which will progress to total rear end paralysis (paraplegia), accompanied by varying degrees of urinary and/or fecal incontinence. As the dog loses its ability to stand and use its hind legs, it may develop bed sores and wounds from urine scalding, which can be extremely painful. It usually takes somewhere between 6 and 12 months for full pelvic paralysis to develop in dogs with DM. The front legs will be affected next, starting with lack of coordinated movement (ataxia) and progressing to complete paralysis. The ability to chew and swallow can also be affected. When all 4 legs are paralyzed, the condition is called “tetraplegia.” Tetraplegia usually occurs within several years of the diagnosis. The dog’s sensory perception abilities are unaffected by this disease, and most affected dogs do not suffer from pain.

SCORE RECESSIVE DOMINANT

A Clear/Normal Clear/Normal

B Carrier/Not Affected Carrier

C At Risk/Affected At Risk